Ethiopian Airlines crash: Boeing faces safety questions over 737 Max 8 jets

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Re: Ethiopian Airlines crash: Boeing faces safety questions over 737 Max 8 jets

Post by Scot Dutchy » Wed Nov 06, 2019 8:13 am

Boing are in deep shit now as other 737's are cracking up:

Boeing 737 cracks: Ryanair grounds three planes due to cracking between wing and fuselage
Exclusive: budget Irish carrier is the latest airline worldwide to be affected by ‘pickle fork’ cracking, but has not disclosed the problem

At least three Ryanair Boeing 737s have been grounded due to cracks between the wing and fuselage but this was not disclosed to the public, the Guardian can reveal.

The budget Irish airline is the latest to be affected by faults in the “pickle fork” structure, which has sparked an urgent grounding of 50 planes globally since 3 October.

While other airlines, such as Australia’s Qantas and America’s Southwest, have disclosed the number of their planes affected by the cracks, Ryanair – which operates the largest fleet of 737s in Europe – has previously refused to confirm how many of its planes have been affected.
One thing that stingy old Michael does do is look after his planes. The cunning old bastard is probably getting a discount from Boeing for keeping it quiet.
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Re: Ethiopian Airlines crash: Boeing faces safety questions over 737 Max 8 jets

Post by JimC » Wed Nov 06, 2019 8:32 am

Yeah, some of our planes have had the same cracking...
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Re: Ethiopian Airlines crash: Boeing faces safety questions over 737 Max 8 jets

Post by Scot Dutchy » Wed Nov 06, 2019 8:36 am

Mentioned in the article Jim along with South West Airlines and China.
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Re: Ethiopian Airlines crash: Boeing faces safety questions over 737 Max 8 jets

Post by Scot Dutchy » Thu Nov 07, 2019 6:29 am

Not just the 737's airworthiness is doubted now its the turn of the 787.

Boeing whistleblower raises doubts over 787 oxygen system
A Boeing whistleblower has claimed that passengers on its 787 Dreamliner could be left without oxygen if the cabin were to suffer a sudden decompression.

John Barnett says tests suggest up to a quarter of the oxygen systems could be faulty and might not work when needed.

He also claimed faulty parts were deliberately fitted to planes on the production line at one Boeing factory.

Boeing denies his accusations and says all its aircraft are built to the highest levels of safety and quality.

The firm has come under intense scrutiny in the wake of two catastrophic accidents involving another one of its planes, the 737 Max - the Ethiopian Airlines crash in March and Lion Air disaster in Indonesia last year.

Mr Barnett, a former quality control engineer, worked for Boeing for 32 years, until his retirement on health grounds in March 2017.

From 2010 he was employed as a quality manager at Boeing's factory in North Charleston, South Carolina.
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Re: Ethiopian Airlines crash: Boeing faces safety questions over 737 Max 8 jets

Post by Scot Dutchy » Tue Nov 12, 2019 6:06 am

Boeing 737 Max jets could fly again by January with safety checks under way
World’s biggest planemaker hopes aviation authorities will soon approve plane’s flight control software

Boeing said on Monday it could have its fleet of 737 Max jets flying again by January as safety checks on the aircraft’s troubled flight software reach completion. The planes were grounded in March in the wake of two fatal crashes in the space of five months that killed 346 people.

The world’s biggest planemaker said it hoped the Federal Aviation Administration would approve certification of the plane’s flight control software before the end of the year. A fault with the plane’s anti-stall mechanism is believed to have caused the Lionair crash in Indonesia last October and then the Ethiopian Airlines disaster in March.

“Based on this schedule, it is possible that the resumption of Max deliveries to airline customers could begin in December, after certification, when the FAA issues an airworthiness directive rescinding the grounding order,” the company said in a statement.

“In parallel, we are working towards final validation of the updated training requirements, which must occur before the Max returns to commercial service, and which we now expect to begin in January.”
Who is trusting the FAA?
The Australian aviation regulator said in September that it may keep the ban in place whatever decision comes out of the FAA.
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Re: Ethiopian Airlines crash: Boeing faces safety questions over 737 Max 8 jets

Post by Scot Dutchy » Thu Dec 12, 2019 5:52 am

Who tells who what to do?

FAA let Boeing 737 Max continue to fly even as review found serious crash risk
Analysis from US regulators found plane could have averaged a fatal crash about every two to three years without design changes

US regulators allowed Boeing’s 737 Max to keep flying even after their own analysis found the plane could have averaged one fatal crash about every two or three years without intervention.

According to a report dated a month after a Lion Air 737 Max crashed in October 2018, killing 189 people, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) concluded the plane could become involved in more fatal crashes without design changes.

A second 737 Max operated by Ethiopian Airlines crashed in March 2019 with the loss of 157 lives. Aviation authorities around the world grounded the Max shortly after the second crash.

The FAA analysis, dated 3 December 2018, was released on Wednesday during a House committee hearing into US’s top aviation oversight of the aircraft’s certification. The review predicted 15 fatal crashes were possible if no changes were made to flight-control software, which has been implicated in both crashes, over the course of the plane’s lifetime.

An FAA spokesperson told the Wall Street Journal, which first reported the news: “It was clear from the beginning that an unsafe condition existed.”

The spokesperson said that the analysis “provided additional context in helping determine the mitigation action”.

According to the Wall Street Journal, FAA officials had major concerns about the Max’s MCAS stall prevention software, which investigators have blamed for the Lion Air crash. But they decided to certify the plane anyway in anticipation of Boeing fixing the software and, in the meantime, telling aircrew worldwide how to respond to MCAS issues.
Boeing are trying hard to get the FAA approval at the cost of what?
The 737 Max is the fastest-selling airplane in Boeing history, accumulating nearly 4,700 orders from more than 100 customers worldwide. Boeing had hoped to get the plane back in the air this year after a major overhaul, but the FAA has said the recertification process will stretch into 2020.
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